Articles

Prediction of the velocity at which liquid separates from a moving contact line

[+] Author Affiliations
Scott D. Schuetter

University of Wisconsin, 1341 Engineering Research Building, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1609

Timothy A. Shedd

University of Wisconsin, 1341 Engineering Research Building, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1609

Gregory F. Nellis

University of Wisconsin, 1341 Engineering Research Building, 1500 Engineering Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1609

J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 6(2), 023003 (May 01, 2007). doi:10.1117/1.2727490
History: Received October 20, 2006; Revised January 12, 2007; Accepted February 15, 2007; Published May 01, 2007
Text Size: A A A

Liquid loss occurs at the receding contact line that forms when a substrate is withdrawn from a liquid. This behavior, often called film pulling, is fundamental to coating and cleaning processes, as well as other systems. There has been substantial prior work relative to understanding the static and dynamic behavior of the receding contact line and film pulling, but this work has focused primarily on operating conditions where the interfacial and viscous forces dominate. In the current work, experimental investigations are presented that identify a second regime, where inertial forces are dominant. These results are used to develop a semiempirical model for predicting the velocity at which an arbitrary liquid is deposited onto an arbitrary smooth substrate from the receding meniscus. The model is verified for a range of fluid properties and is accurate to within 20% mean average error.

Figures in this Article
© 2007 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Scott D. Schuetter ; Timothy A. Shedd and Gregory F. Nellis
"Prediction of the velocity at which liquid separates from a moving contact line", J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 6(2), 023003 (May 01, 2007). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2727490


Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.