SILICON MEMS

Optimization of conductivity monitoring in micromachined silicon capillaries

[+] Author Affiliations
Paul V. Rainey, Neil S. J. Mitchell, Harold S. Gamble

School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Queen’s University Belfast, Belfast BT9 5AH, United Kingdom E-mail: p.rainey@ee.qub.ac.uk

J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 1(2), 159-165 (Jul 01, 2002). doi:10.1117/1.1479708
History: Received Aug. 31, 2001; Revised Dec. 11, 2001; Accepted March 4, 2002; Online July 19, 2002
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This paper investigates the use of electrical conductivity monitoring in silicon-based capillaries and the inherent problems therein. In comparison to reference glass devices, the conductance waveforms from the silicon devices were significantly distorted. This has been shown to be due to the profiles of the ends of the capillaries where single-sided etching was employed, and the silicon dioxide capacitance. Double-sided processing provides a solution to tapering of channel inlets, by reducing the time that the front side is exposed to the KOH solution. Models are developed for the devices, which identify degradation of the oxide isolation as another source of distortion. Matching of the experimental and simulated characteristics enables an estimation of the capacitance between the silicon and the bulk solution. Silicon nitride layers are shown to provide more effective isolation and greatly reduce the distortion observed during conductivity monitoring. © 2002 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

© 2002 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Paul V. Rainey ; Neil S. J. Mitchell and Harold S. Gamble
"Optimization of conductivity monitoring in micromachined silicon capillaries", J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 1(2), 159-165 (Jul 01, 2002). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.1479708


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