Reactive Development Patterning

Heat-resistant photoresists based on new imaging technique: reaction development patterning

[+] Author Affiliations
Takafumi Fukushima, Yukiko Kawakami, Akira Kitamura, Toshiyuki Oyama, Masao Tomoi

Yokohama National University, Department of Advanced Materials Chemistry, 79-5, Tokiwadai, Hodogaya, Yokohama, Japan 240-8501 E-mail: mtomoi@ynu.ac.jp

J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 3(1), 159-167 (Jan 01, 2004). doi:10.1117/1.1633273
History: Received Apr. 7, 2003; Revised Aug. 15, 2003; Accepted Aug. 22, 2003; Online February 17, 2004
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Spin-coated films of nonphotosensitive engineering thermoplastics mixed with photosensitive agent diazonaphthoquinone (DNQ) can be clearly imaged with near-UV light. The selected engineering thermoplastics are commercially available poly(bisphenol A carbonate), polyarylate (U polymer®) and polyetherimide (Ultem®), and synthesized fluorinated polyimide, which have no specific functional groups. Development with a solution including ethanolamine dissolves the irradiated areas to give positive fine patterns. The two-component photosensitive systems shows good photosensitivity and resolution (line/space 10/10 μm) with about 10 to 15 μm in thickness. Gel-permiation chromatography (GPC) and 1H-NMR measurements that can give information on the structure of components dissolved from the irradiated regions are carried out to make clear the imaging mechanism, which we call reaction development patterning (RDP). RDP-based photosensitive polymers showed high heat resistance up to their glass transition temperature (Tg) or above. © 2004 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

© 2004 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Takafumi Fukushima ; Yukiko Kawakami ; Akira Kitamura ; Toshiyuki Oyama and Masao Tomoi
"Heat-resistant photoresists based on new imaging technique: reaction development patterning", J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 3(1), 159-167 (Jan 01, 2004). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.1633273


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