Special Section on Bio-MEMS and Microfluidics

Integrated cantilever development for ultrasonic and acoustic scanning probe microscopy

[+] Author Affiliations
Stephen Olson

University at Albany, State University of New York, College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, 255 Fuller Road, Albany, New York 12203

Balasubramanian Sankaran

University at Albany, State University of New York, College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, 255 Fuller Road, Albany, New York 12203

Bruce Altemus

University at Albany, State University of New York, College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, 255 Fuller Road, Albany, New York 12203

Robert Geer

University at Albany, State University of New York, College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, 255 Fuller Road, Albany, New York 12203

James Castracane

University at Albany, State University of New York, College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, 255 Fuller Road, Albany, New York 12203

Bai Xu

University at Albany, State University of New York, College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, 255 Fuller Road, Albany, New York 12203

J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 5(2), 021107 (May 23, 2006). doi:10.1117/1.2200887
History: Received August 09, 2005; Revised January 17, 2006; Accepted February 02, 2006; Published May 23, 2006
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Although conventional optical lever technology typically used for scanning probe microscope applications has proven high sensitivity, accuracy, and is cost effective for most applications involving micromachined cantilever deflection measurements, the frequency limitations and space needs limit its applicability to emerging ultrasonic-based scanning probe microscopy (SPM) applications. Recently, the fabrication of cantilevers integrated with actuation and sensing components has opened avenues for feedback-based driving of micromachined cantilevers at higher order resonance frequencies, while sensing average deflection without the need of an optical deflection pathway for average deflection sensing. The work presented here reviews recent efforts by our group in fabricating micromachined cantilevers with integrated ZnO actuation layers to induce cantilever deflection. These cantilevers are being fabricated for use in a heterodyne force microscopy system (HFM) to enable SPM imaging contrast based on viscoelastic response of a surface in contact with a micromachined tip, wherein active-feedback technology is being applied to maintain ultrasonic tip excitation at higher order cantilever resonances. The first- and second-pass fabrication results are presented and reviewed regarding cantilever release and ZnO actuator (and electrode) fabrication. Dynamic response data from these structures, measured via laser Doppler vibrometry, reveal the expected resonance structure for a cantilever of these dimensions.

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© 2006 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Stephen Olson ; Balasubramanian Sankaran ; Bruce Altemus ; Robert Geer ; James Castracane, et al.
"Integrated cantilever development for ultrasonic and acoustic scanning probe microscopy", J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 5(2), 021107 (May 23, 2006). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2200887


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