Articles

Measurements of the dynamic contact angle for conditions relevant to immersion lithography

[+] Author Affiliations
Scott Schuetter

University of Wisconsin, Computational Mechanics Center, 1513 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1572

Timothy Shedd

University of Wisconsin, Computational Mechanics Center, 1513 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1572

Keith Doxtator

University of Wisconsin, Computational Mechanics Center, 1513 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1572

Gregory Nellis

University of Wisconsin, Computational Mechanics Center, 1513 University Avenue, Madison, Wisconsin 53706-1572

Chris Van Peski

SEMATECH, 2706 Montopolis Drive, Austin, Texas 78741-6499

Andrew Grenville

SEMATECH/Intel, 2706 Montopolis Drive, Austin, Texas 78741-6499

Shang-Ho Lin

Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, Number 8, Li-Hsin Road 6, Science-Based Industrial Park, Hsin-Chu, 300-77, Taiwan

D. C. Owe-Yang

Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, Number 8, Li-Hsin Road 6, Science-Based Industrial Park, Hsin-Chu, 300-77, Taiwan

J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 5(2), 023002 (May 10, 2006). doi:10.1117/1.2198540
History: Received October 26, 2005; Revised January 09, 2006; Accepted January 20, 2006; Published May 10, 2006
Text Size: A A A

The semiconductor industry has used optical lithography to create impressively small features. However, the resolution of optical lithography is approaching limits based on light wavelength and numerical aperture. Immersion lithography is a means to extend the resolution by inserting a liquid with a high index of refraction between the lens and wafer. This enables the use of higher numerical aperture optics. Several engineering obstacles must be overcome before immersion lithography can be used on an industry-wide scale. One such challenge is the deposition of the immersion liquid onto the wafer during the scanning process; any residual liquid left on the wafer is a potential defect mechanism. The residual liquid deposition is controlled by the details of the fluid management system, and is strongly dependent on the three-phase contact line. Therefore, this work concentrates on understanding the behavior of this contact line, specifically by measuring the dynamic contact angle and the critical velocity for liquid deposition. A contact angle measurement technique is developed and verified; the technique is subsequently applied to measure the dynamic advancing and receding contact angle for a series of resist-covered surfaces under conditions that are relevant to immersion lithography.

© 2006 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Scott Schuetter ; Timothy Shedd ; Keith Doxtator ; Gregory Nellis ; Chris Van Peski, et al.
"Measurements of the dynamic contact angle for conditions relevant to immersion lithography", J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 5(2), 023002 (May 10, 2006). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2198540


Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Journal Articles

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.