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Lens-cementing technology used in optical systems of deep-ultroviolet wavelength regions

[+] Author Affiliations
Takashi Takahashi

Topcon Corporation, Product Engineering Department, General Production and Environment Division, 75-1 Hasumuma-cho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 174-8580, Japan

Toshiki Okumura

Topcon Corporation, Product Engineering Department, General Engineering and Quality Assurance Division, Research and Development Laboratory, 75-1 Hasumuma-cho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 174-8580, Japan

Etsuya Suzuki

Topcon Corporation, Product Engineering Department, General Engineering and Quality Assurance Division, Research and Development Laboratory, 75-1 Hasumuma-cho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 174-8580, Japan

Tatsuya Kojima

Topcon Corporation, Product Engineering Department, General Production and Environment Division, 75-1 Hasumuma-cho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 174-8550, Japan

Hitoshi Suzuki

Topcon Corporation, Product Engineering Department, General Engineering and Quality Assurance Division, Research and Development Laboratory, 75-1 Hasumuma-cho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 174-8580, Japan

Toru Tojo

Topcon Corporation, Product Engineering Department, General Engineering and Quality Assurance Division, Research and Development Laboratory, 75-1 Hasumuma-cho, Itabashi-ku, Tokyo 174-8580, Japan

Koji Machida

Lasertec Corporation, RL Project, 4-10-4 Tsunashimahigashi, Kohoku-ku, Yokohama 223-8551, Japan

J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 6(4), 043010 (November 16, 2007). doi:10.1117/1.2804125
History: Received November 02, 2006; Revised May 14, 2007; Accepted July 26, 2007; Published November 16, 2007
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In this work, a newly developed optical lens cementing technology is reported. A fluoride material is used as an optical cement that can reduce damage from deep-ultraviolet (DUV) radiation. The degradation of transmittance and the surface quality of the cemented optical elements, including adhesive used for cementing, are evaluated after prolonged DUV irradiation. It is shown that with a 248-nm wavelength, this cement works quite well, up to 1000h of operation, and the change in transmittance is negligible where average irradiation power is within 27 to 37mWcm2. Hence for all practical purposes, the use of this cement in microscope objectives is quite acceptable for 248-nm applications, thus confirming that this cementing technology is satisfactory and meets the performance requirement of DUV inspection systems.

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© 2007 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Takashi Takahashi ; Toshiki Okumura ; Etsuya Suzuki ; Tatsuya Kojima ; Hitoshi Suzuki, et al.
"Lens-cementing technology used in optical systems of deep-ultroviolet wavelength regions", J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 6(4), 043010 (November 16, 2007). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2804125


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