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Comparison of three ANSYS finite element tools for analysis of MEMS micromirrors

[+] Author Affiliations
Reza Jafari

K. N. Toosi University of Technology, P.O. Box 16315-1355, Tehran, Iran

Andrew G. Kirk

McGill University, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Montreal, Quebec, H3A 2A7, Canada

J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 6(4), 043011 (November 12, 2007). doi:10.1117/1.2804103
History: Received April 22, 2005; Revised October 02, 2006; Accepted August 30, 2007; Published November 12, 2007
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Finite element (FE) modeling of electrostatically actuated torsional and flexural-torsional microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) micromirrors is investigated by means of three different tools available in ANSYS FE modeling software, and numerical results are compared with static analytical solutions and existing experimental data. These methods include (a) a sequential coupled electrostatic and structural field tool, (b) a directly coupled electrostatic and structural field tool employing one-dimensional transducer element, and (c) a directly coupled electrostatic and structural field tool utilizing a two- or three-dimensional reduced order model. The torsional micromirror is 1000×250μm2, and the flexural-torsional micromirror is 100×100μm2. We present the advantages and disadvantages of these tools for MEMS micromirror modeling. These comparisons allow a selection to be made of the most suitable tool for a given modeling task and assess the accuracy of analytical solutions.

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© 2007 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Reza Jafari and Andrew G. Kirk
"Comparison of three ANSYS finite element tools for analysis of MEMS micromirrors", J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 6(4), 043011 (November 12, 2007). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2804103


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