Articles

Simulation and design of planarizing materials for reverse-tone step and flash imprint lithography

[+] Author Affiliations
Michael W. Lin

The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Chemical Engineering, 1 University Station C0400, Austin, Texas 78712

Brook Chao

The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, Texas 78712

Jianjun Hao

The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Chemical Engineering, 1 University Station C0400, Austin, Texas 78712

Kyle Osberg

The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Chemical Engineering, 1 University Station C0400, Austin, Texas 78712

Paul S. Ho

The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Mechanical Engineering, 1 University Station C2200, Austin, Texas 78712

C. Grant Willson

The University of Texas at Austin, Department of Chemical Engineering, 1 University Station C0400, Austin, Texas 78712

J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 7(2), 023008 (May 13, 2008). doi:10.1117/1.2896047
History: Received July 03, 2007; Revised October 04, 2007; Accepted October 08, 2007; Published May 13, 2008
Text Size: A A A

Reverse-tone step and flash imprint lithography (SFIL-R) shows promise as a cost-efficient, high-resolution patterning technique; however, the generation of satisfactory patterns requires the successful application of a planarizing topcoat over topography through spincoating. Photopolymerizable nonvolatile fluids are ideal topcoat materials because they planarize better than volatile fluids during spincoating and can continue to level after spincoating. Fluid mechanics analyses indicate that complete planarization using capillary force is slow. Therefore, defining the acceptable or critical degree of planarization (DOPcrit) becomes necessary. Finite difference simulation of the spincoat and post-spin leveling processes was used to determine the planarization time for various topographic and material property combinations. A new material, Si-14, was designed to have ideal planarization characteristics (low viscosity—15.1cP; low shrinkage—5.1%) and satisfy SFIL-R processing requirements (oxygen etch resistance—33wt% silicon, photocurable) and was used to validate our models through profilometry and interferometry experiments. During spincoating, minimizing the spin speed generates more planar films; however, this increases the spin time. To rectify this problem, a two-stage spincoating process—a first step with high spin speeds to achieve the target thickness quickly and a second step with low spin speeds to improve planarization—was proposed and experimentally demonstrated.

© 2008 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Michael W. Lin ; Brook Chao ; Jianjun Hao ; Kyle Osberg ; Paul S. Ho, et al.
"Simulation and design of planarizing materials for reverse-tone step and flash imprint lithography", J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 7(2), 023008 (May 13, 2008). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2896047


Tables

Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

PubMed Articles
Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.