Articles

Novolak resins and the microelectronic revolution

[+] Author Affiliations
Stanley F. Wanat

AZ Electronic Materials USA Corporation, Branchburg, New Jersey 08876

Robert R. Plass

AZ Electronic Materials USA Corporation, Branchburg, New Jersey 08876

M. Dalil Rahman

AZ Electronic Materials USA Corporation, Branchburg, New Jersey 08876

J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 7(3), 033008 (August 14, 2008). doi:10.1117/1.2968268
History: Received August 28, 2007; Revised December 20, 2007; Accepted January 20, 2008; Published August 14, 2008
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Novolak resins have had a significant impact on modern life, in general, and more specifically, on photolithography and the microelectronic market in particular. Since their commercialization around 1910, they have found a wide variety of uses. With the switch from solvent developable negative photoresists to the base soluble novolak/diazonaphthoquinone systems, the growth of the resist market has skyrocketed. Successive generations of higher quality resists required refinements in the synthesis, fractionation and purification of the novolak resins used in making those resists. The use of stabilization techniques and continuous processing methods for the preparation of novolak resins and the resists made with them are discussed.

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© 2008 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Stanley F. Wanat ; Robert R. Plass and M. Dalil Rahman
"Novolak resins and the microelectronic revolution", J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 7(3), 033008 (August 14, 2008). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2968268


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