Articles

Modeling of electrochemical micromachining: comparison to experiments

[+] Author Affiliations
Deepak Marla

Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mumbai, 400076, India

Suhas S. Joshi

Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mumbai, 400076, India

Sushanta K. Mitra

Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Mumbai, 400076, India

J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 7(3), 033015 (August 08, 2008). doi:10.1117/1.2964215
History: Received January 17, 2008; Revised April 08, 2008; Accepted April 14, 2008; Published August 08, 2008
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A detailed theoretical modeling of the electrochemical micromachining (EMM) process has been conducted here. The model takes into account a very small interelectrode gap thickness (order of a few micrometers) under which the electric field between the electrodes becomes a predominant factor in governing the machining process. The effect of electric double layer (EDL) also becomes significant under such conditions. The governing equations of the material removal rate are derived by considering a one-dimensional electric field, which is perpendicular to the cross section of the electrode. The model also incorporates the applied pulsed voltage used in EMM. A comparison between the theoretical and the experimental results indicate that, under high voltage and small interelectrode gap, the electric field and the formation of EDL have a significant effect on the material removal rate.

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© 2008 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Deepak Marla ; Suhas S. Joshi and Sushanta K. Mitra
"Modeling of electrochemical micromachining: comparison to experiments", J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 7(3), 033015 (August 08, 2008). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2964215


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