Articles

Ultralow k1 oxide contact hole formation and metal filling using resist contact hole pattern by double line and space formation method

[+] Author Affiliations
Hiroko Nakamura, Mitsuhiro Omura, Souichi Yamashita, Yasuyuki Taniguchi, Junko Abe, Satoshi Tanaka, Soichi Inoue

Toshiba Corporation, Process and Manufacturing Engineering Center, Semiconductor Company, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8522, Japan

J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 7(4), 043001 (October 07, 2008). doi:10.1117/1.2990735
History: Received December 11, 2007; Revised April 04, 2008; Accepted July 24, 2008; Published October 07, 2008
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It was shown previously that the double line and space formation method (DLFM) is superior to other methods for forming a dense contact hole (C/H) resist pattern by simulation, and a 0.30-k1 1:1 C/H resist pattern was formed experimentally. A through process of C/H formation from resist patterning to metal filling is presented. The oxide square C/Hs transferred from the resist pattern formed by the DLFM could be filled with metal, although the transferred C/Hs had square corners in comparison with the conventional C/H resist patterning. On the other hand, the combination of the DLFM and the “pack and cover process” makes it possible to form resist random C/Hs on grids. So, the possibility of forming random C/Hs filled with metal is shown. Moreover, the resolution limit of the DLFM is discussed. The 0.29-k1 (half pitch 65-nm) and 0.27-k1 (half pitch 56-nm) 1:1 C/H resist patterns could be formed with optimized dipole illumination. So, random C/Hs with k1 below 0.30 are expected to be formed.

Figures in this Article
© 2008 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Topics

Hassium ; Metals ; Oxides

Citation

Hiroko Nakamura ; Mitsuhiro Omura ; Souichi Yamashita ; Yasuyuki Taniguchi ; Junko Abe, et al.
"Ultralow k1 oxide contact hole formation and metal filling using resist contact hole pattern by double line and space formation method", J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 7(4), 043001 (October 07, 2008). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2990735


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