Special Section on Theory and Practice of MEMS/NEMS/MOEMS, RF MEMS, and BioMEMS

Polymer microreplication using ultrasonic vibration energy

[+] Author Affiliations
Hyun Woo Yu

Pusan National University, Graduate School of Mechanical Engineering, Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735, Korea

Chi Hoon Lee

Pusan National University, Graduate School of Mechanical Engineering, Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735, Korea

Phill Gu Jung

Pusan National University, Graduate School of Mechanical Engineering, Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735, Korea

Bo Sung Shin

Pusan National University, Engineering Research Center for Net Shape and Die Manufacturing, Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735, Korea

Joon-Ho Kim

Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Bio and Health Laboratory, Nongseo-dong, Giheung-Gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do, 446-712, Korea

Kyu-Youn Hwang

Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Bio and Health Laboratory, Nongseo-dong, Giheung-Gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do, 446-712, Korea

Jong Soo Ko

Pusan National University, Graduate School of Mechanical Engineering and Engineering Research Center for Net Shape and Die Manufacturing, Jangjeon-dong, Geumjeong-gu, Busan 609-735, Korea

J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 8(2), 021113 (May 22, 2009). doi:10.1117/1.3129824
History: Received July 15, 2008; Revised March 20, 2009; Accepted March 24, 2009; Published May 22, 2009
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Polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) microstructures were fabricated by a polymeric microreplication technology using ultrasonic vibration energy. A commercial ultrasonic welder system was used to apply ultrasonic vibration energy for micromolding. Two different types of nickel micromolds, which were equipped with pillar-type and pore-type microstructures, were fabricated. PMMA was used as the polymer microreplication material, and the optimal molding times were determined to be 2s and 2.5s for the pillar-type and pore-type micromolds, respectively. Compared with conventional polymer microreplication technologies, the proposed ultrasonic microreplication technology showed an extremely short processing time. Heat energy generated by ultrasonic vibration locally affected the vicinity of the contact area between the micromold and the polymer substrate. Consequently, only that very limited area was melted so that the bulk material was not seriously affected by the thermal effect and thermal shrinkage could be minimized. Furthermore, although the replication process was not performed in vacuum conditions, the ultrasonic micromolding showed high fidelity in polymer microreplication using the pore-type micromold.

Figures in this Article
© 2009 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Hyun Woo Yu ; Chi Hoon Lee ; Phill Gu Jung ; Bo Sung Shin ; Joon-Ho Kim, et al.
"Polymer microreplication using ultrasonic vibration energy", J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 8(2), 021113 (May 22, 2009). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3129824


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