Articles

Ion implantation as insoluble treatment for resist-stacking process

[+] Author Affiliations
Hiroko Nakamura

Toshiba Corporation, Semiconductor Company, Process and Manufacturing Engineering Center, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8522, Japan

Takeshi Shibata

Toshiba Corporation, Semiconductor Company, Process and Manufacturing Engineering Center, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8522, Japan

Katsumi Rikimaru

Toshiba Corporation, Semiconductor Company, Process and Manufacturing Engineering Center, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8522, Japan

Sanae Ito

Toshiba Corporation, Semiconductor Company, Process and Manufacturing Engineering Center, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8522, Japan

Satoshi Tanaka

Toshiba Corporation, Semiconductor Company, Process and Manufacturing Engineering Center, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8522, Japan

Soichi Inoue

Toshiba Corporation, Semiconductor Company, Process and Manufacturing Engineering Center, 8 Shinsugita-cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8522, Japan

J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 9(1), 013020 (February 03, 2010). doi:10.1117/1.3302123
History: Received November 27, 2008; Revised September 14, 2009; Accepted December 14, 2009; Published February 03, 2010; Online February 03, 2010
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With regard to the resist-stacking process, it was proposed that the implantation of ions whose acceleration voltage was below 50kV could make the lower-layer resist insoluble for the upper-layer resist-patterning process. However, the lower-layer resist pattern is observed to be removed after the upper-layer resist patterning in a pattern. In another type of a pattern, there are caves in the bottom of the lower-layer resist pattern after the upper-layer resist patterning. From the calculation of the projected range of the ions, it is found that the ions cannot reach the bottom of the lower-layer resist pattern, and therefore the bottom of the lower-layer resist is not hardened. The removal is due to the dissolution of the bottom in the lower-layer resist during the development of the upper-layer resist pattern. When the acceleration voltage of the implanted ions is set so that the projected range of the ions is larger than the resist thickness, the lower-layer resist can be made effectively insoluble for the upper-layer resist-patterning process. The ion-implanted pattern can be used as the etching mask. Moreover, the ions can be prevented from penetrating the film to be etched by adjusting the thicknesses of stacked antireflective coating.

© 2010 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Hiroko Nakamura ; Takeshi Shibata ; Katsumi Rikimaru ; Sanae Ito ; Satoshi Tanaka, et al.
"Ion implantation as insoluble treatment for resist-stacking process", J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 9(1), 013020 (February 03, 2010). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3302123


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