Special Section on BioMEMS, Theory and Practice of MEMS/NEMS, and Sensors

Portable electronic nose system with chemiresistor sensors to detect and distinguish chemical warfare agents

[+] Author Affiliations
Li-Chun Wang

National Chiao Tung University, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Taiwan

Kea Tiong Tang

National Tsing Hua University, Department of Electrical Engineering, No. 101 Kuang-Fu Road, Hsinchu, Taiwan 30013

Cheng-Tzu Kuo

Ming Dao University, Institutes of Materials and Systems Engineering, Taiwan

Cheng-Long Ho

Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology, Physical Chemistry Section, Taiwan

Shiao-Ray Lin

Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology, Physical Chemistry Section, Taiwan

Yuh Sung

Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology, Physical Chemistry Section, Taiwan

Chang-Ping Chang

National Defense University, Chung Cheng Institute of Technology, Department of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, Taiwan

J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 9(3), 031010 (July 22, 2010). doi:10.1117/1.3466797
History: Received December 31, 2009; Revised May 07, 2010; Accepted June 08, 2010; Published July 22, 2010
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An electronic nose (E-Nose) has been studied as a means to realize artificial olfaction. Electronic nose “instruments” are currently relatively large, since the signal manipulation and classification are still done by a personal computer (PC) or a laptop. For this reason, we have developed a portable electronic nose system based on a handheld machine by using a vapor detection array made of carbon-black polymer composites and a sensor circuit. In an effort to make a portable electronic nose, we used thin-film chemical sensors based on the carbon-black polymer nanocomposite to reliably detect chemical warfare agents. To replace the large volume of PCs, we used a field-programmable gate array to perform system control, signal manipulation, and classification. This E-Nose system was exposed to dimethyl-methyl phosphonate (DMMP) and dichloromethane (DCM) in parts per million concentration levels. DMMP and DCM were considered as simulants of the nerve agent sarin and the incapacitating agent BZ gases, respectively.

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© 2010 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Li-Chun Wang ; Kea Tiong Tang ; Cheng-Tzu Kuo ; Cheng-Long Ho ; Shiao-Ray Lin, et al.
"Portable electronic nose system with chemiresistor sensors to detect and distinguish chemical warfare agents", J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 9(3), 031010 (July 22, 2010). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3466797


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