Articles

Analysis of a diffractive microlens using the finite-difference time-domain method

[+] Author Affiliations
Yuling Liu

Zhejiang University of Technology, College of Science, Hangzhou 310014, China

Hua Liu

Chinese Academy of Sciences, Changchun Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics and Physics, Opto-Electronics Technology Center, Changchun 130022, China

J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 9(3), 033004 (August 02, 2010). doi:10.1117/1.3469817
History: Received March 29, 2010; Revised June 09, 2010; Accepted June 15, 2010; Published August 02, 2010; Online August 02, 2010
Text Size: A A A

The finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method is used as rigorous electromagnetic analysis model to calculate the field for a diffractive microlens (DML). The FDTD is used for the entire solution rather than using a near- to far-field propagation method to obtain the far-field energy distribution; thus, all the results are vector based. We derived a formula to calculate the magnitude of electric field, which is time dependent and can be used to graphically show the light wave propagation and focusing process through a DML. Both the comparison and the integral methods are presented to obtain wave amplitude in full solution space, and the distribution of light energy behind a DML is illustrated based on the wave amplitude. The formula of diffractive efficiency of the DML is derived from a time-averaged Ponyting vector, which can indicate the propagation direction of light energy. Application of these formulations in the analysis of a DML example demonstrates the high accuracy and efficiency of our method.

Figures in this Article
© 2010 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Yuling Liu and Hua Liu
"Analysis of a diffractive microlens using the finite-difference time-domain method", J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 9(3), 033004 (August 02, 2010). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.3469817


Tables

Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Related Book Chapters

Topic Collections

PubMed Articles
Advertisement
  • Don't have an account?
  • Subscribe to the SPIE Digital Library
  • Create a FREE account to sign up for Digital Library content alerts and gain access to institutional subscriptions remotely.
Access This Article
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($20 for members, $25 for non-members).
Access This Proceeding
Sign in or Create a personal account to Buy this article ($15 for members, $18 for non-members).
Access This Chapter

Access to SPIE eBooks is limited to subscribing institutions and is not available as part of a personal subscription. Print or electronic versions of individual SPIE books may be purchased via SPIE.org.