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Development path and current status of the NANIVID: a new device for cancer cell studies

[+] Author Affiliations
Waseem Khan Raja

Tufts University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 4 Colby Street, Medford, Massachusetts 02155

Michael R. Padgen

University at Albany, College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, 257 Fuller Road, Albany, New York 12203

James K. Williams

University at Albany, College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, 257 Fuller Road, Albany, New York 12203

Frank B. Gertler

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, 77 Massachusetts Ave Building E18-215, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139-4307

Jeffrey B. Wyckoff

Yeshiva University, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Gruss Lipper Biophotonics Center, 1300 Morris Park Ave, Bronx, New York 10461

John S. Condeelis

Yeshiva University, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Gruss Lipper Biophotonics Center, 1300 Morris Park Ave, Bronx, New York 10461

James Castracane

University at Albany, College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering, 257 Fuller Road, Albany, New York 12203

J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 11(1), 013013 (Mar 29, 2012). doi:10.1117/1.JMM.11.1.013013
History: Received July 27, 2011; Revised January 27, 2012; Accepted February 1, 2012
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Abstract.  Cancer cells create a unique microenvironment in vivo that enables migration to distant organs. To better understand the tumor microenvironment, special tools and devices are required to monitor the interactions between different cell types and the effects of particular chemical gradients. Our study presents the design and optimization of a versatile chemotaxis device, the nano-intravital device (NANIVID), which consists of etched and bonded glass substrates that create a soluble factor reservoir. The device contains a customized hydrogel blend that is loaded with epidermal growth factor (EGF), which diffuses from the outlet to create a chemotactic gradient that can be sustained for many hours in order to attract specific cells to the device. A microelectrode array is under development for quantification of cell collection and will be incorporated into future device generations. Additionally, the NANIVID can be modified to generate gradients of other soluble factors in order to initiate controlled changes to the microenvironment including the induction of hypoxia, manipulation of extracellular matrix stiffness, etc. The focus of the article is to present the design and optimization of the device towards wide ranging applications of cancer cell dynamics in vitro and, ultimately, implantation for in vivo investigations.

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© 2012 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Waseem Khan Raja ; Michael R. Padgen ; James K. Williams ; Frank B. Gertler ; Jeffrey B. Wyckoff, et al.
"Development path and current status of the NANIVID: a new device for cancer cell studies", J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 11(1), 013013 (Mar 29, 2012). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JMM.11.1.013013


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