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On-chip near-infrared optical spectrometer based on single-mode Epo waveguide and gold nanoantennas

[+] Author Affiliations
Maurine Malak

Institut de Microtechnique, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Optics and Photonics Technology Laboratory, Rue de la Maladière 71B, CH-2002 Neuchâtel, Switzerland

Konstantins Jefimovs

Swiss Federal Laboratories for Material Science and Technology, Laboratory for Electronics/Metrology/Reliability EMPA, Überlandstrasse 129, 8600 Dübendorf, Switzerland

Irène Philipoussis

Institut de Microtechnique, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Optics and Photonics Technology Laboratory, Rue de la Maladière 71B, CH-2002 Neuchâtel, Switzerland

Joab Di Francesco

Institut de Microtechnique, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Optics and Photonics Technology Laboratory, Rue de la Maladière 71B, CH-2002 Neuchâtel, Switzerland

Toralf Scharf

Institut de Microtechnique, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Optics and Photonics Technology Laboratory, Rue de la Maladière 71B, CH-2002 Neuchâtel, Switzerland

J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 13(2), 023011 (Jun 20, 2014). doi:10.1117/1.JMM.13.2.023011
History: Received March 18, 2014; Revised May 18, 2014; Accepted May 21, 2014
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Abstract.  We report about optical spectrometry using gold nanostructures printed on top of an integrated optical waveguide. The optical waveguide is a single-mode buried waveguide made from a combination of photo-polymerizable materials and is fabricated by photolithography on a glass substrate. To detect the electric field inside the waveguide, a gold nanocoupler array of thin lines (50 nm thick and 8 μm in length) is embedded on top of the aforementioned waveguide. They are produced by e-beam lithography. Both waveguide ports are polished, and the output port, in particular, is coated with a thin gold layer to assimilate a mirror and hence, it enables the creation of stationary waves inside the structure. Stationary waves generated inside the guide constitute a spatial interferogram. Locally, light is out-coupled using the nanocouplers and allows measuring the interferogram structure. The resulting pattern is imaged by a vision system involving an optical microscope with the objective lenses of different magnifications and a digital camera mounted on top of the microscope. The 5× objective lens demonstrates a superior performance in retrieving the investigated spectrum compared to 20× and 100× objectives. Fast Fourier transform is performed on the captured signal to extract the spectral content of the measured signal.

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© 2014 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Maurine Malak ; Konstantins Jefimovs ; Irène Philipoussis ; Joab Di Francesco and Toralf Scharf
"On-chip near-infrared optical spectrometer based on single-mode Epo waveguide and gold nanoantennas", J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 13(2), 023011 (Jun 20, 2014). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.JMM.13.2.023011


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