Articles

Control of chemical residue on photomasks using thermal treatment

[+] Author Affiliations
Han-Byul Kang

Photronics, PKL Research and Development Center, Cheonan 330-300, Korea and Sungkyunkwan University, School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Suwon 440-746, Korea

Yong-Dae Kim, Jong-Min Kim, Hyun-Joon Cho, Moon-Hwan Choi, Sang-Soo Choi

Photronics, PKL Research and Development Center, Cheonan 330-300, Korea

Jee-Hwan Bae, Cheol-Woong Yang

Sungkyunkwan University, School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, Suwon 440-746, Korea

J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 6(1), 013008 (February 12, 2007). doi:10.1117/1.2435715
History: Received June 27, 2006; Revised September 26, 2006; Accepted October 26, 2006; Published February 12, 2007
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We choose thermal treatment as part of a methodology to remove chemical residue on the surface of a mask. This new step of thermal treatment is inserted into our standard cleaning process for embedded attenuate phase shift masks (EAPSMs). The treatment is carried out in a modified hot plate system at various temperatures and times. After thermal treatment, ion chromatography measures the residual ions on a given surface. The thermal treatment is found to considerably reduce residual sulfate ions on the mask surface. The remaining sulfate ions on the mask are <0.18ngcm2 using thermal treatment.

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© 2007 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Han-Byul Kang ; Yong-Dae Kim ; Jong-Min Kim ; Hyun-Joon Cho ; Moon-Hwan Choi, et al.
"Control of chemical residue on photomasks using thermal treatment", J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 6(1), 013008 (February 12, 2007). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2435715


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