SPECIAL SECTION ON SURFACE MICROMACHINING

Characterization of residual strain in SiC films deposited using 1,3-disilabutane for MEMS application

[+] Author Affiliations
Di Gao, Muthu B. J. Wijesundara, Carlo Carraro

University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center, Department of Chemical Engineering, Berkeley, California?94720 E-mail: gaodi@eecs.berkeley.edu

Roger T. Howe

University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Berkeley, California?94720

Roya Maboudian

University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley Sensor and Actuator Center, Department of Chemical Engineering, Berkeley, California?94720

J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 2(4), 259-264 (Oct 01, 2003). doi:10.1117/1.1610478
History: Received Nov. 11, 2002; Accepted Apr. 22, 2003; Online October 03, 2003
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The residual strain of amorphous and polycrystalline SiC films deposited using a single precursor 1,3-disilabutane is characterized as a function of deposition temperature ranging from 700 to 850°C. SiC microstrain gauges and cantilever beam arrays fabricated by micromachining are employed to characterize directly the average residual strain and strain gradient. The residual strain of SiC films changes from compressive to tensile as the deposition temperature increases. The strain gradient is also found to depend on the deposition temperature, and can be adjusted between positive and negative values to fabricate flat, curling-up, and curling-down micromechanical structures. © 2003 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers.

© 2003 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Di Gao ; Muthu B. J. Wijesundara ; Carlo Carraro ; Roger T. Howe and Roya Maboudian
"Characterization of residual strain in SiC films deposited using 1,3-disilabutane for MEMS application", J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 2(4), 259-264 (Oct 01, 2003). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.1610478


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