Articles

Exposure and development of thick polydimethylglutarimide films for MEMS applications using 254-nm irradiation

[+] Author Affiliations
Ian G. Foulds

Simon Fraser University, School of Engineering Science, Institute of Micromachine and Microfabrication Research (IMMR), 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, BC VSA IS6, Canada

Robert W. Johnstone

Simon Fraser University, School of Engineering Science, Institute of Micromachine and Microfabrication Research (IMMR), 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, BC VSA IS6, Canada

See-Ho Tsang

Simon Fraser University, School of Engineering Science, Institute of Micromachine and Microfabrication Research (IMMR), 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, BC VSA IS6, Canada

Manu Pallapa

Simon Fraser University, School of Engineering Science, Institute of Micromachine and Microfabrication Research (IMMR), 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, BC VSA IS6, Canada

Ash M. Parameswaran

Simon Fraser University, School of Engineering Science, Institute of Micromachine and Microfabrication Research (IMMR), 8888 University Drive, Burnaby, BC VSA IS6, Canada

J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 7(2), 023003 (May 13, 2008). doi:10.1117/1.2909468
History: Received June 07, 2007; Revised January 31, 2007; Accepted February 06, 2008; Published May 13, 2008
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Polydimethylglutarimide (PMGI)-based resists are finding increasing use in microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) as both sacrificial and structural materials. PMGI-based resists are commercially available and were originally designed for use in bilayer lift-off applications. Literature on deep-UV exposure and development of PMGI films is limited to films less than 2.5μm in thickness, and use only tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH)-based developers. We investigate the exposure and development of PMGI films greater than 6μm in thickness using the two main classes of developer for PMGI, TMAH, and tetraethylammonium hydroxide (TEAH)-based developers. At these thicknesses, a nonuniform dose through the film due to the optical absorption of the PMGI leads to large gradients in the dissolution properties. We report etch rates as a function of surface dose and development time. Additionally a model is developed to provide a basic predictor of development depth and other important data for fabrication process planning and development.

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© 2008 Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers

Citation

Ian G. Foulds ; Robert W. Johnstone ; See-Ho Tsang ; Manu Pallapa and Ash M. Parameswaran
"Exposure and development of thick polydimethylglutarimide films for MEMS applications using 254-nm irradiation", J. Micro/Nanolith. MEMS MOEMS. 7(2), 023003 (May 13, 2008). ; http://dx.doi.org/10.1117/1.2909468


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